Sunday, 16 June 2019 Sydney
RSS
Connect
Newsletter

Invest In Australia News::

  • 'Political football': Government under pressure on franchising inquiry

    The government is coming under pressure to act on the recommendations of the franchising inquiry, with Labor pledging it will urgently establish a taskforce to implement them if elected.

    The bipartisan inquiry made 71 recommendations for change when it released its damning report on the sector in March, pushing for a total overhaul of the sector and new laws, greater enforcement powers and penalties for the regulator, and a suite of changes to the franchising code.

  • Builders warn global workers critical amid skills shortage

    Australia's home building sector says it's highly vulnerable to a looming skills shortage and needs further support to find building talent from overseas.

    "The issue we have now is that the bar is being set a bit higher in terms of qualifying to bring in skilled labor," Housing Industry Association's Harley Dale says.

    The peak body for the home building industry put out calls on Friday for a separate contractor visa that could be used to bring in-demand workers like bricklayers and tilers into Australia for building construction projects.

  • Charged up: Power startups say their time has come

    Daniel Lawes wants to solve the solar storage challenges of Australian households using the humble hot water tank.

    "Let’s look at what people already have in their homes and take the effort away from the homeowner," he says.

    The British entrepreneur has relocated to Australia in hopes of launching his energy storage startup, Power Diverter, to the local market.

  • Boost in Chinese coal raises hopes of end to Australian import curbs

    China's decision to boost its domestic thermal coal mining industry has raised hopes the country's unofficial restrictions on Australian imports may soon end.

    Australian thermal coal has faced lengthy customs delays at Chinese ports and debate has raged on whether the restrictions were driven by political or economic motivations.

    When restrictions were first reported, some experts suggested China was punishing Australia for its ban on telecommunications company Huawei.

  • Amazon promises one-day shipping, but Australia may have to wait

    Online retail giant Amazon more than doubled profit in the first quarter compared with last year, smashing analyst expectations as it revealed plans to speed up shipping times of its products.

    The company said in a conference call it was working to move its standard Prime shipping times from two days to one, though local retail experts say Australia is unlikely to see such speedy shipping any time soon.

  • Malaysia turns to Australia to build defence capabilities

    The Malaysian Government and industry are actively seeking partnerships with Australian defence companies to build their maritime and aerospace capabilities.

    This was one of the takeaway messages for the 14 Australian defence companies that showcased their products, technologies and services as part of the Team Defence Australia (TDA)-led delegation to the Langkawi International Maritime & Aerospace Exhibition (LIMA ‘19) in Malaysia in March.

  • Sri Lanka suicide bomber studied in Australia, minister says

    State minister of defence says one of bombers was a student in UK and did postgraduate course in Australia

    One of the suicide bombers involved in the Easter Sunday attacks across Sri Lanka studied in the UK and Australia, a Sri Lankan minister has said.

  • Free bus services for veterans this ANZAC Day

    The Tasmanian Government will again offer free Metro bus travel on ANZAC Day to Veterans, War Widows and other service personnel.

    Providing this service continues this tradition over previous years, and is a small token of gratitude in recognition of the significant contribution our service men and women have made serving Australia.

    Members of the Australian Defence Force – the Australian Army, Royal Australian Navy and Royal Australian Airforce – are all entitled to free travel on ANZAC Day provided they are in uniform.

  • CPI supports Government's wage offer

    The ABS today released its Consumer Price Index data for Hobart for the March 2019 quarter, which shows that the cost of living declined in the quarter (by 0.2 per cent), and grew just 2.1 per cent over the year to the March 2019 quarter.

    These figures support the Government’s position with respect to a fair and affordable wage offer to public servants.

    Our most recent offer of seven per cent over three years exceeds the current rate of inflation by a considerable margin. And of course, we have also offered notable improvements in other important conditions.

  • Coalition refers water buybacks to auditor general in hope of defusing scandal

    Audit will investigate the $80m purchase overseen by Barnaby Joyce but Labor says it won’t go far enough

    The Coalition has sought to defuse a growing political scandal over $80m in water buybacks by referring the past decade of commonwealth water purchases to the auditor general.

  • Labor inland rail inquiry gives regional voters 'a clear difference', farmers say

    Anthony Albanese promises independent inquiry into the $10bn Melbourne-to-Brisbane rail project’s route and financing

    The New South Wales Farmers Association has slammed the Nationals for ignoring landholder concerns about the government’s $10bn inland rail project, saying Labor’s proposed inquiry now gives regional Australians “a clear difference between the major parties” in next month’s election.

  • Timor-Leste oil revenue question must wait until after election, Labor says

    Shadow foreign minister Penny Wong hopes parliament will ratify the maritime border treaty as soon as possible

    Calls for Australia to repay a year’s worth of oil and gas revenue revenue to Timor-Leste will not be considered by the Labor party before the election, Penny Wong has said.

  • US company's attempt to sue Australian government collapses

    Florida-based APR Energy sought compensation for treatment of its gas turbines

    A US energy company’s controversial and unprecedented attempt to sue the Australian government has collapsed, leaving taxpayers with a $44,000 bill.

    In 2017 Florida-based APR Energy became the first company to attempt to sue the Australian government under the Australia-US free trade agreement, demanding $344m in compensation for Australia’s treatment of its gas turbines.

  • Australian business ‘simply the best’ for a workable future

    Nepalese international student Abhie Ghimire has not looked back since he decided to pursue his university education in Australia three years ago.

    It’s a long way from his family in the Himalayan region of Nepal but Mr Ghimire, 25, said Australia was “one of the best places in the world to study” because of its prosperous employment opportunities.

  • Australian Industry Group calls for industrial relations freeze until new senators take office

    One of Australia's leading business lobby groups is urging crossbench senators not to pass any industrial relations changes if Parliament sits before the Senate changes over.

    Key points:

  • Fostering a more inclusive Tasmania

    The Hodgman Liberal Government is committed to creating a confident and inclusive community where all Tasmanians are treated fairly, with respect and have an equal opportunity to engage in Tasmanian life.

    The Government’s LGBTI Grants Program provides funds to community organisations, tertiary intuitions and local government, and is aimed at creating a more accepting, diverse and resilient LGBTI community by fostering inclusion and respect for all Tasmanians.

    Four organisations will receive a share of the $50,000 program for five projects in 2019.

    The projects to receive funding are:

  • Neighbourhood House Security Grants

    Neighbourhood Houses are at the forefront of addressing disadvantage in their local community, with many staff and volunteers working selflessly to support others to achieve positive change.

    To ensure that Neighbourhood Houses across the State continue to deliver important services and programs, the Hodgman Liberal Government has funded the Neighbourhood House Security Grants at $150,000 over two years.

    I am pleased to announce that the Burnie Community House has received $4,414 for their security project as part of the Round One allocation.

  • Feasibility Study To Assess KI Artisan Meat Demand

    A feasibility study into artisan meat processing on Kangaroo Island is underway to assess how locally grown and processed red meat can feed the island.

    The State Government has partnered with Livestock SA to commit almost $30,000 to appoint BDO EconSearch to conduct an independent feasibility study into artisan meat processing options on Kangaroo Island.

    Minister for Primary Industries and Regional Development Tim Whetstone said the study is an important step following positive public feedback to a discussion paper released late last year.

  • Australia named safest country in the world for women

    • Australia is the safest country in the world for women, according to data the consultancy New World Wealth released in its 2019 Global Wealth Migration Review.
    • Australia has earned the top spot for women’s safety for the second year in a row, followed by Malta, Iceland, New Zealand, and Canada.
    • Many of those countries are also popular destinations for individuals with a net worth of over $US1 million,
  • Ticket resale website found guilty of ripping off Aussie customers with hidden fees, cancelled events and no refunds

    Ticket resale site Viagogo has been found guilty of misleading Australian consumers in the Federal Court Thursday, although no penalty has been handed down yet.

    The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) took action against the Switzerland-based company after complaints from hundreds of Aussies ripped-off by heavy ticket price mark-ups, hidden fees, cancelled events and no refunds.

    Additional fees included a 27.6 per cent booking fee which applied to most tickets.

  • Australian unemployment lifts despite another strong month of hiring

    • Australia’s unemployment rate edged up to 5% in March, reversing the decline to an eight-year low in February.
    • The increase came despite a surge in full time employment during the month. Australia’s workforce grew faster than employment, explaining the lift in unemployment.
    • Over 300,000 jobs were created in total over the past year, the largest increase since late 2018.
  • US buy-now-pay-later app Sezzle moves into Afterpay's territory in Australia – but says it's not here to fight

    • Buy-now-pay-later app Sezzle is set to launch on ASX in coming months.
    • Competition in the sector is heating up, with some analysts saying first-in is key to market dominance.
    • Sezzle’s CEO says USA regulation likely to be favorable.

    The latest entrant to the buy-now-pay-later space in Australia is Sezzle.

  • Australia's next retail sales report could be pretty weak after a surprise surge in February

    • Australian retail sales jumped by 0.8% in February, the largest increase in over a year.
    • The NAB’s latest cashless retail sales index suggests that result is unlikely to be repeated in March.
    • It points to an increase in sales of 0.3%, with downside risks.
    • Australia’s official retail sales report for March will be released on May 7, the same day the RBA will announce its next interest rate decision.

  • Spending across the Australian economy has suddenly improved

    • Spending across the Australian economy rose by the most in over a year in March, according to the Commonwealth Bank’s BSI.
    • Growth was recorded across most industries and in all states and territories except for the Northern Territory.